publicdesignfestival:

Art invades the parking lot of the Italian newspaper La Stampa in Turin (Italy). It’s Abithoudini and the author is Agostino Iacurci.

(via npr)


The Moon, April 23, 1972. Apollo 16 astronaut John Young does some raking. It’s just like yard work, except in space. (NASA)

The Moon, April 23, 1972. Apollo 16 astronaut John Young does some raking. It’s just like yard work, except in space. (NASA)

(via euphues)

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Woman and Cats, 1962Will Barnet

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Woman and Cats, 1962
Will Barnet

(via aquaticwonder)

archdaily:

#lookup: the #Yamaha Building in #Ginza by Nikken Sekkei 🇯🇵 #architecture #archdaily #instagood #japan #tokyo #iphonesia #nikkensekkei (at 銀座YAMAHAホール)

archdaily:

#lookup: the #Yamaha Building in #Ginza by Nikken Sekkei 🇯🇵 #architecture #archdaily #instagood #japan #tokyo #iphonesia #nikkensekkei (at 銀座YAMAHAホール)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Vintage Crime Scene Photographs from LAPD

Until recently, an old, deteriorated collection of no less than one million crime scene photographs rested silently in the nearly forgotten archives of the Los Angeles Police department; spanning 150 years of violence and corruption, these images were only recently discovered by the photographer Merrick Morton, who has restored and salvaged many of the images, which will be exhibited at Paramount Pictures Studios from April 25-27 by Fototeka.

(via homicidalbrunette)

nevver:

Doing bald right, Oscillating Profundities

gemmacorrell:

(and after)
(and during)

gemmacorrell:

(and after)

(and during)

(via homicidalbrunette)

claudegrant:

loverofbeauty:
Anton Corbjin:  John Lee Hooker’s Hand

claudegrant:

loverofbeauty:

Anton Corbjin:  John Lee Hooker’s Hand

(via hyhx)

nevver:

Free Speech

nevver:

Free Speech

Adiós, Gabo.

Adiós, Gabo.

euphues:

humanoidhistory:

why-are-you-tiger:

futurist-foresight:

Looking back at Apollo 16.

humanoidhistory:

On April 16, 1972, the Apollo 16 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral on a journey to the Moon. Astronauts John Young, Charlie Duke, and Ken Mattingly went on the penultimate adventure of the Apollo program with a mission that lasted 11 days, 1 hour, and 51 minutes, ending at 2:45 PM EST on April 27.

SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAACCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCEEEEEEEEEEE

Indeed.

21:41// Baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaabe! Hi. I love you. xxx (Like, woah.)

real-faker:

Wait what the hell is that room way in the back on the ground floor?

Did I miss something in the last 25 years?

(via carvente)

Happy birthday to German scientist Petrus Apianus, aka Peter Apian, born in Saxony on April 16, 1495. A mathematician, astronomer, and cartographer, he was a favorite of Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire. In 1540, Apian created Astronomicum Caesareum and dedicated it to his imperial benefactor. It was a sumptuous Renaissance instructive manual that explained, in part, how to use an astrolabe to calculate the altitude of the stars and planets. (Bibliotheque Nationale de France)

(via euphues)

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Melancholic illustrations for children by Japanese artist  Sleepy

(via rabbitbonez)

fastcompany:

Watch How Google X Employees Deal With Failure

An inside look at the inner-workings of Google’s top-secret research lab.

Google X isn’t like most R&D labs. In this month’s featureFast Company was granted first-of-its kind access into Google’s top-secret research laboratory, where “moonshots” trump real-world feasibility, and failure is openly encouraged. “If we can get to a no quickly on an idea, that’s almost as good as getting to a yes,” says Rich DeVaul, head of Google X’s Rapid Evaluation team in the video above. Hit play to watch what happens when the very active imaginations of some very smart people are given free rein to fail.

"Reverse archeology"